Difference between revisions of "Stevia"

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=== 2018 ===
 
=== 2018 ===
 
* (Wikipedia, 2018) ⇒ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevia Retrieved:2018-4-23.
 
* (Wikipedia, 2018) ⇒ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevia Retrieved:2018-4-23.
** '''Stevia''' () is a sweetener and [[sugar substitute]] extracted from the leaves of the plant species ''[[Stevia rebaudiana]]''. The active compounds of stevia are [[steviol glycoside]]s (mainly [[stevioside]] and [[rebaudioside]]), which have up to 150 times the [[sweetness]] of sugar,  are heat-stable, [[pH]]-stable, and not [[fermentation (food)|fermentable]].<ref name="ijb.v4n1p146"></ref> Stevia's taste has a slower onset and longer duration than that of sugar, and some of its extracts may have a bitter or [[licorice]]-like [[aftertaste]] at high concentrations. The legal status of stevia as a [[food additive]] or [[dietary supplement]] varies from country to country. In the United States, high-purity stevia glycoside extracts are [[generally recognized as safe]] (GRAS) and allowed as ingredients in food products, but stevia leaf and crude extracts do not have GRAS or [[Food and Drug Administration]] (FDA) approval for use in food.<ref name="FDA2017"></ref> The [[European Union]] approved stevia additives in 2011,<ref name="eu-approved2"></ref> and in [[Japan]], stevia has been widely used as a sweetener for decades.<ref name="Japan"></ref>
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** '''Stevia''' is a sweetener and [[sugar substitute]] extracted from the leaves of the plant species ''[[Stevia rebaudiana]]''. The active compounds of stevia are [[steviol glycoside]]s (mainly [[stevioside]] and [[rebaudioside]]), which have up to 150 times the [[sweetness]] of sugar,  are heat-stable, [[pH]]-stable, and not [[fermentation (food)|fermentable]].<ref name="ijb.v4n1p146"></ref> Stevia's taste has a slower onset and longer duration than that of sugar, and some of its extracts may have a bitter or [[licorice]]-like [[aftertaste]] at high concentrations. The legal status of stevia as a [[food additive]] or [[dietary supplement]] varies from country to country. In the United States, high-purity stevia glycoside extracts are [[generally recognized as safe]] (GRAS) and allowed as ingredients in food products, but stevia leaf and crude extracts do not have GRAS or [[Food and Drug Administration]] (FDA) approval for use in food.<ref name="FDA2017"></ref> The [[European Union]] approved stevia additives in 2011,<ref name="eu-approved2"></ref> and in [[Japan]], stevia has been widely used as a sweetener for decades.<ref name="Japan"></ref>
 
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Revision as of 04:48, 14 June 2019

A Stevia is a Sugar Substitute that ...



References

2018

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