Mechanical Work

From GM-RKB
(Redirected from Work (physics))
Jump to: navigation, search

A Mechanical Work is a physical force on a physical object that results in a displacement (in the direction of the force).



References

2015

  • (Wikipedia, 2015) ⇒ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work_(physics) Retrieved:2015-12-29.
    • In physics, a force is said to do work if, when acting on a body, there is a displacement of the point of application in the direction of the force. For example, when a ball is held above the ground and then dropped, the work done on the ball as it falls is equal to the weight of the ball (a force) multiplied by the distance to the ground (a displacement).

      The term work was introduced in 1826 by the French mathematician Gaspard-Gustave Coriolis [1] as "weight lifted through a height", which is based on the use of early steam engines to lift buckets of water out of flooded ore mines. The SI unit of work is the newton-metre or joule (J).

  1. Coriolis, Gustave. (1829). Calculation of the Effect of Machines, or Considerations on the Use of Engines and their Evaluation (Du Calcul de l'effet des Machines, ou Considérations sur l'emploi des Moteurs et sur Leur Evaluation). Paris: Carilian-Goeury, Libraire.