Data Base Instance

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A Data Base Instance is a data record set (of data base records) that share a data record schema.



References

2014

  • (Wikipedia, 2014) ⇒ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Database Retrieved:2014-5-9.
    • A database is an organized collection of data. The data are typically organized to model relevant aspects of reality in a way that supports processes requiring this information. For example, modelling the availability of rooms in hotels in a way that supports finding a hotel with vacancies.

      Database management systems (DBMSs) are specially designed software applications that interact with the user, other applications, and the database itself to capture and analyze data.

2011

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Database
    • A database is an organized collection of data for one or more purposes, usually in digital form. The data are typically organized to model relevant aspects of reality (for example, the availability of rooms in hotels), in a way that supports processes requiring this information (for example, finding a hotel with vacancies). The term "database" refers both to the way its users view it, and to the logical and physical materialization of its data, content, in files, computer memory, and computer data storage. This definition is very general, and is independent of the technology used. However, not every collection of data is a database; the term database implies that the data is managed to some level of quality (measured in terms of accuracy, availability, usability, and resilience) and this in turn often implies the use of a general-purpose Database management system (DBMS). …

2009

  • http://www.lib.fsu.edu/help/libraryterms
    • Database: a structured collection of information in computerized format, searchable by various types of queries; in libraries, often refers to electronic catalogs and indexes.


  • http://metacyc.org/MetaCycDefinitions.shtml
    • Structured Data. Structured data are data that have been represented in a manner that allows computation with those data. For example, the data within MetaCyc are highly structured because different properties and relationships of metabolic enzymes, pathways, and reactions have been carefully dissected and assigned to distinct fields of a database so that they are independently queryable and computable. Therefore, we can ask questions across the data such as "find all enzymes that use magnesium as a cofactor" or "find all pathways in which pyruvate is an input substrate".



1997