Government Entity

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A Government Entity is an organization that defines and enforces regional policy for some governed region.



References

2013

  1. "government". Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford University Press. November 2010. http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/government. 
  2. Bealey, Frank, ed. (1999). "government". The Blackwell dictionary of political science: a user's guide to its terms. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 147. ISBN 0631206957. http://books.google.com/books?id=6EuKLlzYoTMC&pg=PA147. 
  3. "government". Oxford English Dictionary: American English, Oxford University Press. 2012. http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/american_english/government. 

1848

  • (Thoreau, 1848) ⇒ Henry David Thoreau. (1849). “Resistance to Civil Government (Civil Disobedience)."
    • QUOTE: I heartily accept the motto, — “That government is best which governs least;” and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which I also believe, — “That government is best which governs not at all;” and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient.

1776

  • (Paine, 1776) ⇒ Thomas Paine. (1776). “Common Sense."
    • QUOTE: Some writers have so confounded society with government, as to leave little or no distinction between them; whereas they are not only different, but have different origins. Society is produced by our wants, and government by wickedness; the former promotes our happiness positively by uniting our affections, the latter negatively by restraining our vices. The one encourages intercourse, the other creates distinctions. The first is a patron, the last a punisher.

      Society in every state is a blessing, but government even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one; for when we suffer, or are exposed to the same miseries by a government, which we might expect in a country without government, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer. Government, like dress, is the badge of lost innocence; the palaces of kings are built on the ruins of the bowers of paradise.