1848 TheCommunistManifesto

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Subject Headings: Communist League, Revolutions of 1848, Class Struggle, Marxism, Communism,

Notes

Cited By

2015

  • (Wikipedia, 2015) ⇒ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Communist_Manifesto Retrieved:2015-1-28.
    • The Communist Manifesto (officially Manifesto of the Communist Party) is an 1848 political manifesto by German philosophers Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels that laid out the programme of the Communist League. Originally published in German (as Manifest der kommunistischen Partei) just as the revolutions of 1848 began to erupt, the Manifesto has since been recognized as one of the world's most influential political manuscripts. It presents an analytical approach to the class struggle (historical and present) and the problems of capitalism and the capitalist mode of production, rather than a prediction of communism's potential future forms.

      The Communist Manifesto contains Marx and Engels' theories about the nature of society and politics, that in their own words, "The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles".[1] It also briefly features their ideas for how the capitalist society of the time would eventually be replaced by socialism, and then finally communism.

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Quotes

Introduction

A spectre is haunting Europe — the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.
II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

Chapter I. Bourgeois and Proletarians

The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.

Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each time ended, either in a revolutionary reconstitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes.

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References

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 AuthorvolumeDate ValuetitletypejournaltitleUrldoinoteyear
1848 TheCommunistManifestoKarl Marx (1818-1883)
Friedrich Engels (1820-1895)
The Communist Manifesto1848