1879 ASystemofLogicRatiocinativeandI

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Subject Headings: Logical Thinking.

Notes

Cited By

Quotes

Book I. Of Names And Propositions.

Of The Necessity Of Commencing With An Analysis Of Language.

It is so much the established practice of writers on logic to commence their treatises by a few general observations (in most cases, it is true, rather meagre) on Terms and their varieties, that it will, perhaps, scarcely be required from me, in merely following the common usage, to be as particular in assigning my reasons, as it is usually expected that those should be who deviate from it.

The practice, indeed, is recommended by considerations far too obvious to require a formal justification. Logic is a portion of the Art of Thinking: Language is evidently, and by the admission of all philosophers, one of the principal instruments or helps of thought; and any imperfection in the instrument, or in the mode of employing it, is confessedly liable, still more than in almost any other art, to confuse and impede the process, and destroy all ground of confidence in the result. For a mind not previously versed in the meaning and right use of the various kinds of words, to attempt the study of methods of philosophizing, would be as if some one should attempt to become an astronomical observer, having never learned to adjust the focal distance of his optical instruments so as to see distinctly.

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References

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 AuthorvolumeDate ValuetitletypejournaltitleUrldoinoteyear
1879 ASystemofLogicRatiocinativeandIJohn Stuart Mill (1806-1873)A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence and the Methods of Scientific Investigation1879
AuthorJohn S. Mill +
titleA System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence and the Methods of Scientific Investigation +
year1879 +