Argument

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See: Quarrel, Reasoned Argument, Adjucative Argument, Function Argument, Predicate Parameter, Mathematical Argument, Linguistic Argument, Verb Semantic Role Argument, Formal Argument, Informal Argument.



References

2009

  • WordNet
    • a fact or assertion offered as evidence that something is true; "it was a strong argument that his hypothesis was true"
    • a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal; "the argument over foreign aid goes on and on"
    • (computer science) a reference or value that is passed to a function, procedure, subroutine, command, or program
    • a variable in a logical or mathematical expression whose value determines the dependent variable; if f(x)=y, x is the independent variable
    • argumentation: a course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating a truth or falsehood; the methodical process of logical reasoning; "I can't follow your line of reasoning"

2009

2009

2009

2009

  • http://www.logic-classroom.info/glossary.htm
    • argument is a series of connected reasons in support of a position or a conclusion.
  • Misc
    • Argument: An effort to establish belief by a course of reasoning.
    • Argument: A course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating truth or falsehood.
    • Argument: From the Latin, "to make clear"
    • Argument: A course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating truth or falsehood: a statement, reason, or fact for or against an idea or viewpoint

2009

  • http://www.economicexpert.com/a/Argument.html
    • (in logic) a logical argument, that is, an attempt to proved a demonstration of the truth of a conclusion based on the truth of a set of premises
    • (in mathematics) at least three different things:
      • a parameter or independent variable that is the input to a function (in the function f(x), for example, x is the argument)
      • in complex analysis one component of the mod-arg form of that number (see complex number)
      • the line of reasoning that a proof of a proposition follows
    • (in linguistics) at least two different things:
      • the so-called core arguments of a verb, that is, the phrases that make up the sentence in combination with it
      • arguments to predicates and other sentential elements, such as the prepositional argument in "under the table" (which is the prepositional object "the table")
    • (in computer science, informally) an actual parameter passed to a subprogram (analogous to the first sense listed above for mathematics)
    • (in oratory or lawThis article is about law in society. For other possible meanings, see law (disambiguation). Law (a loanword from Danish-Norwegian lov, in politics and jurisprudence, is a set of rules of conduct which mandate or proscribe (or both) specified relationshi) the presentation of evidential reasoning in an attempt to persuade the listener of the correctness of the speaker's position (this usage not only covers logical arguments but also includes other forms of persuasion, such as purely emotional arguments)
    • (in common usage ) a dispute, disagreement or antagonistic discussion

2009

  • CYC Glossary http://www.cyc.com/cycdoc/ref/glossary.html
    • argument: The term "argument" is used in two different ways by Cyclists:
      • Most commonly, the term "argument" is used to refer to any CycL term which follows a predicate, a function, a logical connective, or a quantifier in a Cycl expression. Thus, in the CycL formula (#$likesAsFriend #$BillM #$Goolsbey), #$likesAsFriend is a predicate, and #$BillM and #$Goolsbey are the first and second arguments to that predicate.
      • The term "argument" is also used to refer to a reason why an assertion is present in the KB with its truth value. Arguments are of two main types: the first type of argument is essentially a statement that the formula was explicitly "asserted" (or "local"). The second type of argument is the group of assertions through which the assertion was "inferred" (in which case the assertion is called "remote"). In this case there is a chain of inference which supports the truth value of the supported assertion. Such arguments are also called deductions.