World Population Statistic

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A World Population Statistic is a population statistic for the total number of living humans on Earth.



References

2014

  • (Wikipedia, 2014) ⇒ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/world_population Retrieved:2014-11-29.
    • The world population is the total number of living humans on Earth. In June 2013, the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division estimated that , the world population was 6.916 billion. [1] The United States Census Bureau estimates that the world population exceeded 7 billion on March 12, 2012.[2] According to a separate estimate by the United Nations Population Fund, it reached this milestone on October 31, 2011.[3] [4][5] The median age of the world's population was estimated to be 29.7 years in 2014. The world population has experienced continuous growth since the end of the Great Famine and the Black Death in 1350, when it was near 370 million. [6] The highest growth rates – global population increases above 1.8% per year – occurred briefly during the 1950s, and for longer during the 1960s and 1970s. The global growth rate peaked at 2.2% in 1963, and has declined to below 1.1% . Total annual births were highest in the late 1980s at about 138 million, [7] and are now expected to remain essentially constant at their 2011 level of 134 million, while deaths number 56 million per year, and are expected to increase to 80 million per year by 2040. 2012 UN projections show a continued increase in population in the near future with a steady decline in population growth rate; global population is expected to reach between 8.3 and 10.9 billion by 2050. 2003 UN Population Division estimates for the year 2150 range between 3.2 and 24.8 billion.[8] One of many independent mathematical models supports the lower estimate, while a 2014 estimate forecasts between 9.3 and 12.6 billion in 2100 and growing thereafter. [9] Some analysts have questioned the sustainability of further world population growth, highlighting the growing pressures on the environment, global food supplies, and energy resources. [10] [11][12]
  1. TOTAL POPULATION BOTH SEXES. esa.un.org
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  5. Jean-Noël Biraben (1980), "An Essay Concerning Mankind's Evolution". Population, Selected Papers. Vol. 4. pp. 1–13. Original paper in French: (b) Jean-Noël Biraben (1979). “Essai sur l'évolution du nombre des hommes". Population. Vol. 34 (no. 1). pp. 13–25.
  6. World Population Prospects, 2010 revision (686 million births from 1985–1990). United Nations. Retrieved February 14, 2013.
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  8. Carrington, Damien, (18 September 2014) World population to hit 11bn in 2100 – with 70% chance of continuous rise The Guardian, Retrieved 21 September 2014
  9. Peter P. Rogers, Kazi F. Jalal and John A. Boyd (2008). An Introduction To Sustainable Development. Earthscan. p.53.
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