Controlled Vocabulary

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A controlled vocabulary is a terminology composed of controlled terms and their word sense definitions intended to facilitate shared communication within some expertise domain.



References

2014

2009a

  • http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/controlled_vocabulary#Noun
    • (information science) A carefully selected set of terms - words and phrases - such that each concept from the domain of discourse is described using only one term in the set and each term in the set describes only one concept.

2009b

2009c

2008a

2008b

2005a

2005b

  • (ANSI Z39.19, 2005) ⇒ ANSI. (2005). “ANSI/NISO Z39.19 - Guidelines for the Construction, Format, and Management of Monolingual Controlled Vocabularies." ANSI.
    • QUOTE: controlled vocabulary: A list of terms that have been enumerated explicitly. The list is controlled by and is available from a controlled vocabulary registration authority. All terms in a controlled vocabulary must have an unambiguous, non-redundant definition. At a minimum, the following two rules must be enforced: 1) If the same term is commonly used to mean different concepts, then its name is explicitly qualified to resolve this ambiguity. 2) If multiple terms are used to mean the same thing, on of the terms is identified as the preferred term in the controlled vocabulary and the other terms are listed as synonyms or aliases. The primary purpose of vocabulary control is to achieve consistency in the description of content objects and to facilitate retrieval. Vocabulary control is accomplished by three principal methods: defining the meaning of terms; using the equivalence relationship to link synonymous terms; and distinguishing among homographs.
      • NOTE: This is a design goal that may not be true in practice; it depends on how strict the controlled vocabulary registration authority is regarding registration of terms into a controlled vocabulary. At a minimum, the following two rules must be enforced:
      • 1. If the same term is commonly used to mean different concepts, then its name is explicitly qualified to resolve this ambiguity. NOTE: This rule does not apply to synonym rings.
      • 2. If multiple terms are used to mean the same thing, one of the terms is identified as the preferred term in the controlled vocabulary and the other terms are listed as synonyms or aliases.

1990

1986