State of Desire

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A State of Desire is a positive emotional state (by a emotional agent) to intentionally attain for some future state.



References

2016

  • https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/desire#Verb
    1. To want; to wish for earnestly.
      • I desire to speak with you.
    2. To put a request to (someone); to entreat.
      • And when they founde no cause of deeth in hym, yet desired they Pilate to kyll him. --Bible, Acts XIII:
    3. To want emotionally or sexually.
      She has desired him since they first met.
    4. To express a wish for; to entreat; to request.
      • Desire him to go in; trouble him no more. --Shakespeare

2015

  • (Wikipedia, 2015) ⇒ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desire Retrieved:2015-10-11.
    • Desire is a sense of longing or hoping for a person, object, or outcome. The same sense is expressed by emotions such as "craving.” When a person desires something or someone, their sense of longing is excited by the enjoyment or the thought of the item or person, and they want to take actions to obtain their goal. The motivational aspect of desire has long been noted by philosophers; Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679) asserted that human desire is the fundamental motivation of all human action.

      While desires are often classified as emotions by laypersons, psychologists often describe desires as different from emotions; psychologists tend to argue that desires arise from bodily structures, such as the stomach's need for food, whereas emotions arise from a person's mental state. Marketing and advertising companies have used psychological research on how desire is stimulated to find more effective ways to induce consumers into buying a given product or service. While some advertising attempts to give buyers a sense of lack or wanting, other types of advertising create desire associating the product with desirable attributes, by showing either a celebrity or a model with the product.

      The theme of desire is at the core of romance novels, which often create drama by showing cases where human desire is impeded by social conventions, class, or cultural barriers. The theme of desire is also used in other literary genres, such as gothic novels (e.g., Dracula by Bram Stoker, in which desire is mingled with fear and dread). Poets ranging from Homer to Toni Morrison have dealt with the themes of desire in their work. Just as desire is central to the written fiction genre of romance, it is the central theme of melodrama films, which use plots that appeal to the heightened emotions of the audience by showing "crises of human emotion, failed romance or friendship", in which desire is thwarted or unrequited.

2007

2001

1998

  • Steve Jobs. (1998). BusinessWeek (25 May 1998)
    • QUOTE: But in the end, for something this complicated, it's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them.

1996

  • Steve Jobs. (1996). Interview in WIRED magazine (February 1996)
    • QUOTE: When you're young, you look at television and think, There's a conspiracy. The networks have conspired to dumb us down. But when you get a little older, you realize that's not true. The networks are in business to give people exactly what they want. That's a far more depressing thought. Conspiracy is optimistic! You can shoot the bastards! We can have a revolution! But the networks are really in business to give people what they want. It's the truth.

1989

  • Steve Jobs. (1989). Interview with Inc. Magazine for its "The Entrepreneur of the Decade Award" (1 April 1989)
    • QUOTE: You can't just ask customers what they want and then try to give that to them. By the time you get it built, they'll want something new.

1880

  • (Dostoyevsky, 1880) ⇒ Fyodor Dostoyevsky. (1880). “The Brothers Karamazov."
    • QUOTE: ... but what do we see in this freedom of theirs? Nothing but slavery and self-destruction! For the world says:

      “You have desires and so satisfy them, for you have the same rights as the most rich and powerful. Don't be afraid of satisfying them and even multiply your desires.” That is the modern doctrine of the world. In that they see freedom. And what follows from this right of multiplication of desires? In the rich, isolation and spiritual suicide; in the poor, envy and murder; for they have been given rights, but have not been shown the means of satisfying their wants. They maintain that the world is getting more and more united, more and more bound together in brotherly community, as it overcomes distance and sets thoughts flying through the air.
      Alas, put no faith in such a bond of union. Interpreting freedom as the multiplication and rapid satisfaction of desires, men distort their own nature, for many senseless and foolish desires and habits and ridiculous fancies are fostered in them. They live only for mutual envy, for luxury and ostentation.