Mind

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A Mind is a System within an Agent that can Model a Domain and make Choices based on Beliefs, Interests and Goals.



References

2013

  1. 1.0 1.1

    Dictionary.com, "mind": "1. (in a human or other conscious being) the element, part, substance, or process that reasons, thinks, feels, wills, perceives, judges, etc.: the processes of the human mind. 2. Psychology. the totality of conscious and unconscious mental processes and activities. 3. intellect or understanding, as distinguished from the faculties of feeling and willing; intelligence.”

  2. Google definition, "mind": "The element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world and their experiences, to think, and to feel; the faculty of consciousness.." [1]
  3. Redding, Paul, "Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2012 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), forthcoming. [2] . See section "2.1 Background: “Idealism” as understood in the German tradition".[expand reference]
  4. Smart, J. J. C., "The Mind/Brain Identity Theory", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2011 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), [3]
  5. Oxford American College Dictionary, "mind": "1. the element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world and their experiences, to think, and to feel; the faculty of consciousness and thought."

A Mind is a Cognition that ...



References

2014

  1. 1.0 1.1 Dictionary.com, "mind": "1. (in a human or other conscious being) the element, part, substance, or process that reasons, thinks, feels, wills, perceives, judges, etc.: the processes of the human mind. 2. Psychology. the totality of conscious and unconscious mental processes and activities. 3. intellect or understanding, as distinguished from the faculties of feeling and willing; intelligence.”
  2. Google definition, "mind": "The element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world and their experiences, to think, and to feel; the faculty of consciousness." [4]
  3. Redding, Paul, "Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2012 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), forthcoming. [5] . See section "2.1 Background: “Idealism” as understood in the German tradition".
  4. Smart, J. J. C., "The Mind/Brain Identity Theory", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2011 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), [6]
  5. Oxford American College Dictionary, "mind": "1. the element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world and their experiences, to think, and to feel; the faculty of consciousness and thought."